slipperyskip

Project Worklogs => Completed Projects => Topic started by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:21:57 PM

Title: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:21:57 PM
Welcome to my latest project log.  I'm calling it Ingraham because I'm taking inspiration from one of my favorite radio designers from the thirties and fourties.  Ingraham didn't build radios.  They were a clock company that got into designing and building wooden radio cases for the big name radio companies like Emerson, GE and Stromberg-Carlson.

The front of the case is dominated by a 7-slat horizontal louver (louvre for you Brits) system that is designed to hide two 3-incn (76mm) ventilation ports. 

(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/001.jpg)
I apologize for the crude photos.  I haven't got my photography kit together yet.  My tripod has walked on me.  Pictured above is seven 3/16" x 3" basswood planks cut to the width of the case.  Spacing the slats out are 3/16" support planks.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/002.jpg)
The support planks are set back at a 3/8" depth all around.  This photo kinda simulates what it will look like.  No glue here only clamps.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/003.jpg)
The support planks are brought back out flush with front edge.  This gives me a flat surface draw my 3" circle.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/004.jpg)
The support planks are pulled and cut at the pencil marks.  The resulting pieces are reassembled.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:23:49 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/005.jpg)
When finished, the computer will be viewed on a tabletop at a downward angle.  The vent holes magically disappear behind the louvers.  All together now...oooh...aaah.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/006.jpg)
I took the newly made support pieces and cloned them by clamping each piece down to some stock.  I then use my Xacto razor saw to make clean-edged cuts.  This is how I make all my cuts.  I've never used a power saw of any kind. 



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/007.jpg)
The cloned supports are inverted to form a mirror image and mounted on the other side of the louvers.  The edges are still very square and will be sanded down later to help form a cleaner circle.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/008.jpg)
This work forms the outer two edges of each vent hole.  The inner edges will be formed later by adding support pieces to the center resulting in two (hopefully) perfect circles.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/009.jpg)
The victim...a Silverstone LC06.  The large blank space at the top part of the faceplate is where the louvers will end up.  The entire faceplate will be replaced along with the top cover.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/010.jpg)
Ass end shot.  Silverstone is sending me a new LC06 but I've owned one for years and know quite a bit about it.   Interesting thing to note about the LC06....it has no case fans.  How cool would it be if case manufacturers made cases especially for modders that have no fan holes?  You could cut out holes wherever you needed them and whatever size you wanted.  Hmmmm.....



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/011.jpg)
Inside shot.  The LC06 is solid aluminum except for the tiny mini-ITX motherboard tray.  The tray also mounts a 3.5" hard drive below the board.  The full-sized optical drive mounts directly to the case floor.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:26:24 PM
Meanwhile, back at the ranch....I got a package from Silverstone with my LC06.  I gutted it and ripped off it's faceplate.  Hmmm...case carcass.

(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/012.jpg)
I've decided not to build my own cover.  Instead, I'll be cladding the existing aluminum cover with a wooden shell.  There is pencil mark across the front where I'm going to dremel off the top of the face.  The dremeling will continue back about three inches into the case and up across the top resulting in removal of the entire front corner.  I will call this operation "The Frontal Lobotomy".


(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/013.jpg)
This stuff will get remounted onto the back of the plate because my replacement face plate is thinner than the stock face plate.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:30:00 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/014.jpg)
More panel cutting.  I use 3/8" x 3" planks of lazer-cut lumber to form a fence.  One side is "tacked down" using mini-clamps while the other is used to keep the saw at 90 degrees.  Here I'm cutting the side panels out of 3/16" 5-ply aircraft-grade birch plywood.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/016.jpg)
The side panels being fitted up.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/015.jpg)
Showing off some materials and things. On bottom is the 3/16" plywood mentioned above.  Next is a sheet of 1/32" birch plywood...yes...1/32" or .8mm 3-ply aircraft-grade plywood. On top of that is a 3" wide sheet of American black walnut veneer.  Topping things off is my master carving for the domed roof.  I'll be using five identical "rafters" to create the slightly domed top to the computer case.  I built the master carving by eye using a razor knife and sandpaper.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/017.jpg)
The master curve is mated up with the other rafters so I can start cutting out the excess corner material.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/018.jpg)
The original faceplate is an impressive chunk of aluminum.  Here I'm using it to cut out the openings for the front panel ports.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:31:52 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/019.jpg)
Frontal lobotomy brought to you by the Dremel Corp.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/022.jpg)
The front panel ports and power switch holes are cut into the 3/8" thick face plate.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/021.jpg)
The face plate is attached to the computer using countersunk machine screws with nuts and washers. Later, the screw holes will be wood puttied, sanded down and covered up with a tasty walnut veneer.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/020.jpg)
A progress fitting.  The louver sub-assembly will fit here, sorta, kinda.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:35:36 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/023.jpg)
I drilled out holes and fitted up a side panel with machine screws, washers and nuts.  I took some measurements and then removed the panel for cutting.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/024.jpg)
Hand cut slots that took about 2 hours each to saw out with my X-acto razor saw and an X-acto razor knife.  Tough going through plywood. The cuts create a cradle that the louver sub-assembly will fit into.

To answer a recent question...basswood is not the same as balsa.  Balsa comes from the Amazon rainforest.  Basswood is grown in managed forests in Michigan, USA.  Basswood is a hardwood and is much stronger than balsa but both are very millable and easy to work with.


(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/025.jpg)
I put stuff together loosely to check the fit and get the total width correct.  I had cut the louvers extra wide which is just the way I do things.  Measure three times and then cut it too long.  Later I will mill everything back to where it needs to be.  It is a lot of extra work but stuff happens and plans change so I'm glad I give myself that extra little bit.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/026.jpg)
The corner in the foreground is all lined up the way I want.  The excess hangs out over the far side.  After getting the true center I cut and fit the center section of the vent ducts.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:39:59 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/025.jpg)
I put stuff together loosely to check the fit and get the total width correct.  I had cut the louvers extra wide which is just the way I do things.  Measure three times and then cut it too long.  Later I will mill everything back to where it needs to be.  It is a lot of extra work but stuff happens and plans change so I'm glad I give myself that extra little bit.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/026.jpg)
The corner in the foreground is all lined up the way I want.  The excess hangs out over the far side.  After getting the true center I cut and fit the center section of the vent ducts.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/017.jpg)
I'm finishing an earlier step that was started with this photo.  Four 3/8" basswood planks pinched around my master curve.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/027.jpg)
Knocked down the corners with a hand saw and finsihed working down to the master curve with 60-grit sandpaper.  I rotate the planks often in order to maintain symmetry.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/028.jpg)
Results:  Five identical curved rafters.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/029.jpg)
I trimmed up a couple of the rafters and temporarily fit them for a photo op.  The Silverstone LC06 is beginning to disappear.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:41:52 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com//Ingraham/032.jpg)
The rafters are set into place after the edges of the side panels are beveled to the angle of the curve.  The rafters are all hand milled to a friction fit.  The square piece in place of the louver section is a temporary spacer.



(http://slipperyskip.com//Ingraham/030.jpg)
1/2" square basswood stock is cut into sections using my miniature mitre box and X-acto saw.



(http://slipperyskip.com//Ingraham/031.jpg)
I got a little work done on the back end.  In front is my pile of eight 1/2" square blocks.



(http://slipperyskip.com//Ingraham/034.jpg)
The blocks are temporarily placed.  They will act as spacers and support but will primarily be used as glue blocks.  The stressed plywood going on top will need all the glue-down surface it can get on the edges.  The blocks are pictured unfinished. They still need to be sanded down to conform to the curve.



(http://slipperyskip.com//Ingraham/033.jpg)
I haven't done any gluing so far.  Everything is still friction fit or bolted up.  I like to wait doing any irreversible step for a s long as possible. This photo shows my "crack line" around the front panel.  I put a lot of thought and effort into planning how to crack the case open.



(http://slipperyskip.com//Ingraham/035.jpg)
The two pieces apart to hopefully illustrate the crack line.  I pay more attention to hiding the crack line than most anything else.  Determining how to open the case was one of the first design decisions made and everything else has worked around it.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:44:11 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/036.jpg)
I finished up the glue blocks and sanded everything down to the curve.  I also countersunk and re-attached the screws in my sidepanels.


It's TOOLTIME!  (Everyone make Tim Taylor grunting noises.)

This photo shows a few of my favorites.  In the foreground is a Nicholson 4-In-Hand hand rasp.  It has four different surfaces to really tear out chunks of wood with great precision. I have used this tool in all of my projects and consider it an old friend.

Two drill bits, the right one is what I use to countersink screw holes.  The left one is a brad point drill bit.  Any woodworker MUST have a set of brad points.  They feature a very sharp point that makes it impossible for the tip to travel.  Both drill bits have masking tape wrapped around the shaft because I often drill holes by hand.  Wrapping masking tape creates a "grippy" surface when twirling the bit between my thumb and forefinger.  Smaller drill bits need the extra width from the tape to ease the drilling motion. (Cue pron music..boom chicka wah wah)

Clamps.  Can't have too many is the rule of thumb.  Different kinds and sizes is also a must.  Here are two popular Irwin models.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:45:40 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/037.jpg)
I have glued everything up using professional carpenters wood glue and allowed to dry for 24 hours.  All the pieces that I intentionally cut too long are sanded into submission.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/038.jpg)
The screw holes are all filled with wood filler, dryed and sanded down.  The lone screw shown toward the bottom will be one of the actual case screws.  Later, much fussing will ensue in order to stealth these in.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/039.jpg)
The front panel wood filling work in process.  Goop it on and sand it down.  I'm not actually sure if all this is necessary in order to veneer over the screws but I have done it before with success and it makes me look like I know what I'm doing.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/040.jpg)
I call this the louver floor.  It is 1/8" thick and was fairly sturdy before I cut the large slot in the side.  The slot is to clear the mini-ITX motherboard.  The slot cutting weakened the plank slightly and produced a fragile tab in the corner.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/041.jpg)
The solution was to flip it over and glue support pieces to the underside.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/042.jpg)
The floor is fitted up.  This photo includes a size comparator.  The case is still fairly small even though I've added so much fluff.

I'm dragging my feet on the next step in this project.  It involves using contact cement to install the roof.  You cannot make ANY mistakes using contact cement because it bonds instantly.  The only solution to a mistake is to throw it away and start from scratch.  If there are no more updates to this worklog it is because I have flung myself off a roof.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:47:00 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/043.jpg)
It is a beautiful day here in Florida.  Good thing because I need to move the toxic fumes outside.  Coffee...black.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/044.jpg)
The contact cement needs to dry for 15 minutes.  Meanwhile, I stuff some foam into the pockets to hopefully help with sound deadening.  Seemed like the thing to do.  It will probably get ripped apart thinking I'm smuggling drugs or something.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/045.jpg)
Instant bonding, no clamps required.  The stainless Thermos cap is used to apply pressure to the surface.  You are suppose to do that with a fancy roller.  You have to put down some fairly serious pressure in order to get a tight bond.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/046.jpg)
2 hours later, trim with saw and finish up wth sandpaper.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/047.jpg)

(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/048.jpg)

I guess I can put my ladder away.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:48:32 PM
Veneering. My favorite task these days.  It hasn't gotten old yet. I do things different...of course.  I use regular carpenter's glue instead of contact cement.  One big difference is drying time.  I spend a lot of time watching glue dry.

(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/049.jpg)
Creative clamping is both a skill and an art.  A lot of these "sculptures" being displayed for 6 - 12 hours each.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/050.jpg)
One of many pieces in the collection.  I usually run out of clamps and have to re-learn the skill of patience.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/051.jpg)
Barbie's Malibu Pillbox Bunker (now with reinforced blast roof and walnut bar top.) 



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/052.jpg)
Many, many twisted contortions of clamping forced materials.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/053.jpg)

(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/054.jpg)
Walnut faceplate before trimming.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/055.jpg)
Faceplate trimmed and rough sanded before being fitted for a photo.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:50:23 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/056.jpg)
The steel motherboard tray screws into the bottom at four spots and to the back at two spots.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/057.jpg)
Without the support of the steel tray there isn't much left.  There can't be more than a Foster's can worth of aluminum here.  It is very light and fragile.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/058.jpg)
The bottom of the tray showing where the 3.5" hard drive is bolted on.  Yes...you can mount two drives with a little modding.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/059.jpg)
The top of the tray showing the four standard mini-ITX motherboard mounting points.  The tray is pressed steel with serious sharp edges.  I'll be knocking down these edges and repainting after a minor modification. 

This simple steel bracket is a fine piece of engineering.  I wish SilverStone sold them separately.  You could build an entire system around this bracket.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/060.jpg)
Measured up some 3/16" x 3/8" stock.  Cut and milled the edges.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/061.jpg)
Fit the new pieces into the "grill".



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/062.jpg)
When you run out of clamps then it's time to go old school.  For you young folks these are called books.  They are pdf prototypes.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:51:54 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/063.jpg)
They sent me a single sheet of gnarly black walnut with this batch.  Here I used it on the back panel.  It will be interesting to see how it finishes.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/064.jpg)
Flip side shot showing the lip veneering.  Rule of thumb for veneering....do the boring stuff first and leave your money shot for last.  This rule helps to determine where the edge seams go.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:53:32 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/065.jpg)
Got some painting done over the weekend.  I call this the motherboard thong because it is all the support the board needs.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/066.jpg)
Painted Thong Red of course.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/067.jpg)
Ready to mount some equipment.


(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/070.jpg)
The mini-ITX board I'll be using is the new VIA VB8001.


(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/071.jpg)
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:54:31 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/072.jpg)
The veneering is progressing.  Here you can see my "crack line" behind the front panel that has been sanded and buffed with steel wool so it is darker than the rest of the case.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/073.jpg)
A little something red peeking out from behind.  Isn't that the way it always happens?



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/074.jpg)
Clamping operations when veneering on a curve.  Almost art in itself.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 12:55:57 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/076.jpg)
Here's my goodies from Crucial.  The larger box is an external enclosure kit for a 2.5" hard drive.  Next is 4GB of DDR2 (2 x 2GB) and finally, the big daddy....a 64GB solid state hard drive.  I got the enclosure because it has a 3.5" bay mounting option that I might use in the project. 



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/077.jpg)
Finished veneering.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/078.jpg)
The wood is going to get seriously dark (and hard to photograph) after I start to apply the finish



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/079.jpg)

This post brought to you by:

(http://slipperyskip.com/Crucial.jpg)
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 01:03:32 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/080.jpg)
This is after a single coat of lacquer sanding sealer.  I don't do stains.  This is the natural color.  This photo was taken with natural light and no flash.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/081.jpg)
I use sanding sealer mainly to highlight the flaws like glue marks and high points.  It also lets me cheat and look ahead to see how it will look when finished.  :D



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/083.jpg)



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/084.jpg)
The VIA VB8001 mini-ITX mainboard.  Now and then the gods let me play with Unobtainium and this is a nice chunk of it.  The new VIA Nano CPU (this one a 1.6GHz variety) mated to a 16x PCIe slot and 4GB of DDR2.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/085.jpg)
Test fitting.  I need the board installed because I have to modify the back of my "grill" to relieve some internal interferences.



Meanwhile, back at the grill...

(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/086.jpg)
This is my disassembled louvered structure called "the grill".  I sanded down every side of all 37 pieces that make up the structure.  I'm preparing to glue the whole thing together...finally.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/087.jpg)
The 2.5" SSD is screwed into a backplate as I begin construction of the world's most expensive/elaborate 2.5/3.5" drive mount adapter.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/088.jpg)
The backplate slides into the brushed stainless steel carrier and the end cap is screwed into place.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/089.jpg)
The 3.5" hot swap port is attached to where the hard drive should go.  The carrier is "plugged in".



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/090.jpg)
The device is ready to go.  The push button ejects the carrier and there is an LED activity light mounted to the center section.  Woo hoo!  Light feature!

Why? you ask....well I would have had to buy a 2.5" to 3.5" adapter and a 2.5" SATA power cable adapter.  Now I don't.  The 3.5" hot swap section takes a plain floppy power cable.  Besides, there's that blinky fancy light feature that fulfills my case modding requirements in that area.  8)
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 01:05:01 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/091.jpg)
Here I'm analyzing the interferences that the installed motherboard w/ memory modules creates with the back of the grill.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/092.jpg)
Not as bad as I expected.  The memory doesn't come into play at all.  I had to modify these two pieces to clear a few caps, the front panel pin connector and the CPU fan power plug.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/093.jpg)
I spent most of the weekend trimming each of the 28 edges that make up the vent holes.  This shot shows the supports flush to the front to better illustrate the work.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/094.jpg)
Here the supports are pushed, or indented, 3/8" into the structure creating the louver effect.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/095.jpg)
Slightly angled upward causes the vent holes to vanish.  The drawn-on circles will be sanded off.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/096.jpg)
To create the center circle I took 3/8" stock, cut and carved the edges, and inserted them into the matrix.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/097.jpg)
Finished center circle minus the top arch.

Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 01:06:40 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/098.jpg)
I'm finally getting to the grill glueing.  I have put together the 37 pieces exactly as I want them and lightly spray painted the still clamped up structure.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/099.jpg)
Taking the structure apart layer by layer.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/100.jpg)
Revealing shadows where the pieces need to go back together after a light coating of wood glue.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/101.jpg)
verything back together again for a good drying.  I left the uppermost support layer out of the structure because it will be used to shim the grill into the case.  The big unknown here is how much height the 15 layers of glue will add to the grill structure.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/102.jpg)
I thought it was time to discuss my inspiration for this case mod.  This is the 1946 Stromberg Carlson model 1110H radio.  The two things that attracted me to this design (besides the wrap-around louvers) are the gently curving roof and the foot structure.  This was the end of the art deco era and the beginning of the streamlined era when curves and other aircraft-inspired styling cues came into fashion.


(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/103.jpg)
The wooden case was designed and built for Stromberg Carlson by the Ingraham Co.  The two photos above were captured off of ebay a year apart.  Part of the reason I was convinced to emulate this design is the fact that I still liked the radio's style a year later.


(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/104.jpg)
The big controversy at the moment is whether I should include the "top strap" or leave it off.  I am leaning toward putting it on because I like the contrast that it brings.  I even considered doing the strap in mahogany or cherry but the cross-directed wood grain looks pretty good IMHO. 
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 01:09:22 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/111.jpg)
After two coats of satin finish brush-on lacquer and about five coats of industrial aluminum spray paint on the grill.  Long, long way to go on both pieces but it has allowed me to envision the mocked-up top strap better.  The strap is unfinished and just loosely laid out.  Wow, there is such a difference between the raw and finished walnut.  I think it is the lighting.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/112.jpg)
After great deliberation and agonizing about the cooling system I decided to go with the PCI slot blower fan solution.  Embedding fan(s) into the front vents would have been cool.  Cutting fan holes in the back was obvious.  This is an Evercool Fox-1 Guided Missile. Mission Destroy according to the label. Hmmm??? 



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/113.jpg)
It matches the rest of the red/black theme going on and bolts right in.  I'm going to build up the support structure because I don't trust that UPS will allow the blower to stay in place during shipping.  That's experience talking and also why I won't install a video card....yet.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/114.jpg)
I even considered Dremeling out part of back panel including the PCI brackets and installing a 120mm but I want those slots.  There is room for two 60mm fans side by side or maybe a radiator. :idea:



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/115.jpg)
This is how I make circles.  I needed a 3 1/4" circle so I rough cut some wood, set up the drill and ground it down against some sandpaper.  It might need to be a little thinner...no problem with my poor man's lathe.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 01:12:19 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/116.jpg)
My modding completely wrecked the Silverstone case's closure system so I have to invent my own.  This is a stainless steel brad-mount T-nut.  I used industrial strength super glue to adhere it to the case.  I followed that up with  small sheet metal screws driven through the T-nut base into the case.  Finished up by Dremeling off the sheet metal screw threads sticking out the other side. 



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/117.jpg)
Repeat on both sides of the case.  This is a stainless steel 10-24 machine screw driven through a hole in the case into the T-nut.  Also shown is the "screw head hider" as I call it.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/118.jpg)
The hider is snapped into place.

I'm doing these small tasks while waiting for various coats of lacquer and paint to dry.  My lacquering  process will involve at least a dozen coats each being sanded by progressively finer and finer sandpaper.


(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/119.jpg)
More clamping sculpture.  I made up some foot pads by gluing up two pieces of wood to the proper height.  I clamped down the four resulting pads into this shape.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/120.jpg)
Temporarily glued them into the proper place using rubber cement.  Glued up the footer skirting pieces using the pads as backing support.  The pads protrude 1/16" out past the skirting so they are the sole load bearers.
 


(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/121.jpg)
Yup.  More clamping sculpture.  There are 18 pieces of wood that make up the footer.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/122.jpg)
The footer after a coat of sanding sealer in preparation for the first coat of gloss black.spray paint.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/123.jpg)



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/124.jpg)
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 01:13:44 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/125.jpg)
This is something I built from scrap wood for the sole purpose of fighting UPS's evil plans for destruction.


(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/126.jpg)
The PCI slot blower is mounted to the case's aluminum frame with a single screw.  It wouldn't last 50 feet down the road in the back of a UPS truck.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/127.jpg)
My temporary support bracket will get two screws into it up from the bottom.  :eeek:  The arms grasp the blower with a friction fit.  Hmm.. I think I will paint it red.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/128.jpg)
I lost count but I think I finished up with ten coats of lacquer.  Before the final coat I used a few of the wife's Emory boards (or as I prefer, sandpaper-on-a-stick) and knocked down all the edges and corners.  Sharp edges are more prone to damage from blunt force objects (like UPS employees).



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/129.jpg)
These first two photos were taken in artificial light.  The last two are done in natural.  The burl came out interesting and I'm glad I used it.
 


(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/130.jpg)
Finished up with #0000 steel wool and will eventually hit it with a couple of coats of Johnson's Paste Wax.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/131.jpg)
This is a satin finish so I stopped just short of the pumice rubbing step required to go full gloss.  I'm not a big fan of gloss.  Looks too much like fake plastic to me.

Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 01:16:35 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/132.jpg)
I'm getting close to the end when I'm finishing up the crack line.  I have left the veneer hanging over the edges of both mating surfaces.  I stick a strip of thin 320 grit sandpaper between the surfaces and work it like dental floss back and forth until the case closing screws line back up and thread easily.  If you can't see the line then my work is done. :p



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/133.jpg)
I am playing around with my laser waterslide decals.  I tried to get a silver-colored version that would contrast with the dark wood but...no go.  Instead of wasting it I placed it on the backside.  I need to find a laser printer that prints the color white.  That is a very rare beast.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/134.jpg)
The Ingraham at 90% complete.  I still have some painting to do on the footer because I got a bad can of spray paint.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/137.jpg)
The "Ingraham" water slide decal will (hopefully) go on the bottom left hand panel.  It needs something there.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/138.jpg)
All of the walnut is the same color.  It shows up different sometimes only because of the lighting.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/139.jpg)
This last photo is kind of my favorite because it shows the continuity of grain in the center strap as it transitions from front to top. 

LOL...after all that BS about the louvers hiding the vent ports...it turns out the reflections of the openings are getting bounced off the top of the fins.  Oh well....it sounded good at the time.
Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 01:18:00 PM
Ingraham @ 99%.  I have only the front emblem to deal with and that's apparently going to take time.  One version I'm looking at:

(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/Ingraham4.JPG)

(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/141.jpg)
Backside shot showing my new rheostat.  I'll take any opportunity to add something knurled.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/142.jpg)
I'll be taking the "lid" back off soon to photograph the interior so I left off the case closing screw covers for now.



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/143.jpg)
I disassembled the entire computer and put it back together using matching screws and Permatex Threadlock (medium strength).


Title: Re: Ingraham - 2008
Post by: slipperyskip on August 10, 2014, 01:21:26 PM
(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/149.jpg)



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/150.jpg)



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/151.jpg)



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/152.jpg)



(http://slipperyskip.com/Ingraham/153.jpg)


Specs:

VIA VB8001 motherboard w/16x PCI-e
VIA Nano CPU @ 1.6 GHz - 1MB L2 cache, 17W TDP, 100mW @ idle
4GB Crucial DDR2 667 memory
64GB Crucial SSD
Silverstone 60W PSU
Silverstone LC06 LaScala case (modified)
Evercool Fox-1 system blower @ 42CFM (rheostat control)
Ubuntu 8.10 OS



(http://slipperyskip.com/silver.jpg)

(http://slipperyskip.com/Crucial.jpg)

(http://slipperyskip.ipower.com//logo_VIA_L.jpg)