Author Topic: Project Addison - 2014  (Read 50430 times)

slipperyskip

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Re: Project Addison - 2014
« Reply #15 on: October 12, 2014, 03:30:15 PM »





slipperyskip

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Re: Project Addison - 2014
« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2014, 11:53:21 AM »

First up is a discovered mystery that hasn't yet been solved. I was getting some serious fan noise at idle that I wasn't too happy with. Tracked it down to the Scythe which was surprising because I chose the Medium Speed model because of comments about excessive noise from the High Speed model. It turns out the problem is with the perpendicular radiator plate. I slid the running fan up for removal and once it cleared the plate the noise disappeared. Very odd. I'm going to sand the sharp plate edges down to make it more aerodynamic. Hopefully that will fix it.

 


Invested in more clamps. Ask any woodworker...you can't have too many clamps.




I have a pre-gluing ritual where I simulate the clamping scheme. First step is to assemble the proper sized clamping supports.




I never clamp the actual surfaces directly but instead use a support. In this case I'm using an additional support on the opposite side because of holes and some delicate mesh framing.




This simulation helps me figure out if I can bring the pain in an evenly manner. This gluing operation will be very difficult because of the curve. Professionals use a vacuum pump system to veneer curves.




First step in this veneering job is the inside edge of the vent holes. I discovered that my Tupperware tumbler fits perfectly in the vent hole.




Cut strips of veneer and soaked them in water. Wrapped them around the tumbler and secured them with rubber bands. Let them dry for a couple of days. Later, the same tumbler will be used to "clamp" the strips into place. I prepared both mahogany and myrtle strips because that hasn't been decided yet.




Prepared some samples to do some testing. These have a single coat of lacquer applied.




I'll be doing some masking tape testing. I built and attached a simulated decorative element that will be spray painted. I'm testing two different masking tapes to see if they work well with solvent-based paint and if the adhesive damages the lacquer finish.

 


Burl pr0n for burl fans.

Thanks for looking!

slipperyskip

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Re: Project Addison - 2014
« Reply #17 on: October 16, 2014, 03:38:12 PM »
If you are allergic to extreme minutia then please skip this update. People have been bugging me for years to do a veneering tutorial. I have resisted because...well...you are about to find out. I was trained to veneer by professional cabinet makers but the process I have developed over the past 12 years doesn't resemble the professional method.

The difference is driven by the fact that I place no restrictions on my time.


Preparing. Got my coffee (black) and my Jawbone Jambox (Project Orchestra) tuned to the Pandora Steely Dan channel.

I cried when I wrote this song,
Sue me if I play too long.





Sprung the mahogany strips from the Tupperware tumbler. Yes, I'm going with the Mahogany Crotch. I give it a 60% success rate because of the brittle, damage prone veneer and the fact I don't have enough of it to survive an error. Back up plan is to layer the burl on top of it.




Great photo of the top of Orchestra. Doh! Auto-focus through a hole. Shows the overlap to be trimmed.




Mark the overlap with my 90-year-old mechanical pencil and cut the excess off with my EZ-Cutter. Still left too much...on purpose.




Use a 100-grit professional nail file designed to work on fake acrylic nails. Fit the veneer, file some off, fit, file, fit, file until I get the perfect fit.




Glue of choice. Common water-based carpenters glue. I like my glue to be fresh.




Wet paper towel for cleanup. I apply the glue with my fingers. It is very important to not get any glue on the veneer outer surface because it will show up later when a finish is applied.




Very bad photos of glue.


One of the major problems with veneering is glue bleed through. That is why I never apply glue to the veneer surface.




Tupperware tumbler "clamping" the veneer into place.




View from the underside.




I get about 15 minutes before the glue sets up. I have developed a process I call clenching. I remove the clamping pressure every few minutes and place it again from a different position. Here I have inserted the tumbler from the underside. By applying pressure from different directions the glue gets "worked in" from the clenching action.




During the clenching operation before the glue sets up I take time to sand the gap. This is to generate saw dust and force it into the gap. This helps hide the seam.




Let dry for three hours. The excess veneer is still very fragile and will need to be gently trimmed down to about 1mm. I do this by carving with my razer knife.


It is important to know the direction of the woodgrain. The grain will either guide the knife blade towards the hole or away from it. Carve in the direction that guides the blade away from the hole otherwise there is a real risk of tearing out a large section right across the wrong surface. Also, the grain can change directions along its length so the carving needs to be adjusted for that.






Down at 1mm the veneer is sturdy enough to accept sanding along its edge but not across it. The underside is sanded down flush to the mesh support.




This is what I'm trying to avoid here.




The topside edge will have another piece of veneer glued perpendicular across the top of it. For these edges I do what I call a Tupperware lip. That's another one of those things I have developed over the years. I take a regular nail file and sand the edge down until it leaves a very small "bump" as felt by fingertip.




This is done instead of sanding flush to the surface. The lip forces the overlaying veneer to have positive contact along the entire edge. This creates a much tighter seal along the seam so it can keep moisture out. That's how veneer fails. Another advantage of the Tupperware lip is that during gluing a finger can be run across the edge scraping glue off and pooling it up right where I want it to be pooled.

And that's it.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2014, 03:44:59 PM by slipperyskip »

slipperyskip

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Re: Project Addison - 2014
« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2014, 05:12:35 PM »

Masking tape testing. On the left is Frog Tape and on the right is 3M 233. After getting the Frog Tape home I read the fine print that its for latex paint only and not to apply it to lacquer. The 3M 233 tape is the same as the 401 tape. Not sure why they have two numbers.




After a single coat.




5 coats later. The edges of the Frog Tape are peeling up.




The 3M 233 tape came up nicely with no residue. The Frog Tape left a small amount of adhesive behind but it came off easily by just rubbing it with a finger.




Neither tape left what I would consider a clean line. I figured out that it was because of the angle and the paint that was pooling up in the deep corner. I'm going to have to figure out how to fix this problem. Suggestions? On past projects I have been able to finish these items separately and mate them together at the end. Not this time.




Front panel clamping scheme. Pain. Brought.




Rear panel. I have to kinda laugh at people building cases out of 1/2" or 3/4" lumber. Are they building a computer enclosure or a step ladder for their fat aunt Gladys? I shouldn't make fun because that's how I also started.






The spliced section down below is some scrap mahogany being used as a spacer. A decorative element will cover that entire area.




Sanded with 80-grit so the surface is still very raw. I'll edge up gradually to 200-grit before hitting it with lacquer sanding sealer. Then the fun really starts.






OK so now I'm just showing off. :) This is the lip on the inside edge of the back panel.






Thanks for looking!

slipperyskip

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Re: Project Addison - 2014
« Reply #19 on: October 20, 2014, 12:57:17 PM »
This post is brought to you by Pink Floyd

Well you wore out your welcome with random precision, rode on the steel breeze.
Come on you raver, you seer of visions, come on you painter, you piper, you prisoner, and shine!



So I have been rethinking my method to finish the wood and aluminum parts. In the past I have finished them separately and later merged them together. The clean line tape test was a failure but I'm thinking that was my fault for not taking the time to do it right. Still...makes me nervous because failure here would be a nasty one.




What I have come up with is a hybrid approach. It's too complicated to explain which means I barely have a clue. Works perfectly in my head of course.




The continuation of the DE over the back edge has always been one of my pet peeves. I hate it when a radio's decoration just stops at the back edge like it was sliced off. I prefer the optical illusion of a continuation around to the back.




Here I have glued together three major parts of the DE. I did this "on frame" so it would be a perfect fit. The trick was to not glue it permanently into place prematurely.




This now allows me finish and paint the edges that border the wood surface. I can't completely finish the DE off chassis for reasons not yet apparent.




The big problem here is the extremely fragile and delicate structure of this piece. I also have to be wary of any added layers to either mating surface causing them difficulty in being reunited later.








I left the lower "layer" of the hole small and unfinished so it could be properly trimmed back and finshed with wood filler and paint. This hopefully will make it appear like a "solid" hole and not one just made up from layers.




Rough cut the bumpers.




To get the proper curve I used this paint can wrapped in 100-grit sandpaper. It was pure luck in finding the perfect sized can.







Thanks for looking!
« Last Edit: October 20, 2014, 01:07:23 PM by slipperyskip »

slipperyskip

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Re: Project Addison - 2014
« Reply #20 on: October 23, 2014, 03:14:47 PM »
This post brought to you by Brazilian Jazz. Bossa Nova!


Hit it with a couple of coats of brushing lacquer but I don't like the brush. I'm currently shopping for something more appropriate for this project.




It's all about the width and how much lacquer the bristles can carry. The brush stroke has to be one long continuous motion with an even application start to finish.





I made the mistake of editing my render to show black decorative elements instead of my standard aluminum. I thought it looked interesting and my people now prefer it. My wife says I'm not fooling anyone with the fake aluminum anymore. Maybe it's time to try fake plastic. Here I'm trying out different paints on different woods with some tape thrown in for S&G.

Life just got more complicated.




Glued up pieces of the bumpers. Talk about delicate. Sheesh.



Fitting the bumper






Thanks for looking!
« Last Edit: October 29, 2014, 09:50:18 AM by slipperyskip »

slipperyskip

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Re: Project Addison - 2014
« Reply #21 on: October 25, 2014, 12:51:13 PM »

I use samples made up at Home Depot for this kind of painting. The interior structure will be painted this French Silver to help simulate the look of a painted steel chassis instead of chunks of lumber.




Taped off the edges where the outer shell makes contact. I've learned to not paint sliding surfaces because they usually don't slide very well after a layer of flat latex is applied. If the fit becomes sloppy from use I'll just hit these areas with paint and it tightens right up.




Bumper work.








Just to prove that these elements are still removable at this moment. Much easier to finish the detail work and paint when they are "off chassis".




Bumpers are finished and ready for paint.




The waterfall grille has already been started. The grille will consist of nine vertical "slats" two of which are already placed in these photos. You can see them on the outer edges. The remaining seven will be equally spaced to span the top and front vent holes.





Thanks for looking!

slipperyskip

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Re: Project Addison - 2014
« Reply #22 on: October 26, 2014, 05:10:33 PM »
I think it is time to spill a few beans. Inspiration for this project is a 1940's Canadian radio made by Addison. The Model 2 is one of the most valuable and sought after collector radios in the world. It's main decorative feature is the waterfall grille which gives the radio its nickname...The Addison Waterfall. Two examples....








Painting the interior a color called Lava Gray. First coat. I'm avoiding surfaces that mate to the interior box because they have to slide against each other Also avoiding the mesh screen areas because they have a gluing event in their future.




Actually this is just an excuse to interview a possible color for my external bits. I love Lava Gray because in my opinion it pairs perfectly with mahogany.




Interior box painting continues. Areas taped off include future gluing surfaces.


Splotch is a shadow. Possibly a carpenter bee trying to supervise.


So the big question is color choice. Short list is Aluminum, Gloss Black, Flat Black, Lava Gray, Butterscotch and Lime Green. Yes....Lime Green. My good friend and insider Alfred Poor who has seen the final renders e-mailed me last night "Wow. I think you could paint it lime green and it would still look awesome." :D

Any opinions?

slipperyskip

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Re: Project Addison - 2014
« Reply #23 on: November 03, 2014, 03:26:37 PM »

Glued a scrap piece of 1/2" square wood to the back of the bumpers near the balance point.




This temporary painting handle will be snapped off and cleaned up later.

 


Taped up the back of the bumpers to keep the wood raw for gluing. I like to trim a 1mm space back from the edge to get a cleaner paint edge and so the tape won't interfere with sanding along the edge.




Wrap a plastic grocery bag around my hand and grasp the handle. This gives me the control I like to have for spraying.




90% finished with the trim paint...or...just got my aluminum pieces in from the CNC mill guys.




Semi-final installation of equipment. The wood panels still haven't been glued together. Access is so much easier with the separate panels. The video card will be swapped out next week and I'd like the room to work that.



Power button in the back where I like it.




Had to do some shimming to the SSD mount. Also took the opportunity to extend the mount for greater support. The additional piece is unpainted in this photo.

 


The corners are raw wood and will remain that way. I even put a coat of paste wax on them and their corresponding outer box surfaces.



As far as the butterscotch goes (or any other color) I gave up on that after doing some testing. I bought some paint that was perfect according to the cap color but it came out a terrible school bus yellow. Took it as a sign, gave myself credit for trying and moved on to the original plan. CNC milled aluminum bumpers and grille. As per design spec. :)

Thanks for looking.


slipperyskip

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Re: Project Addison - 2014
« Reply #24 on: November 04, 2014, 04:02:30 PM »

Four blocks of wood located at each corner of the inner box structure.




Corresponding four "frames" at each corner of the decorative box interior.




To secure the cover in place the blocks tightly mesh with their custom frames. The meshed parts are also painted so a solid friction fit is achieved and easily maintained




The base of the grille is nearing completion after many, many coats of paint. The paint dries completely in 15 minutes and I do my best to sand it all back off between coats. The last 5 coats I allow to build up with a light sanding between with 1500 grit sandpaper. 85% of what you see here is masked off sections. Only the outer edges that border the mahogany are being worked.

The idea is that after this piece is glued in place and the surrounding mahogany is masked off I won't have to spray paint directly into the "border" region. By pre-finishing these border edges it should help solve my masking tape paint line problem.

 


After sanding the finish back to raw wood three times and starting over I'm thinking the fourth might do it. 3 coats of semi-gloss brushing lacquer lightly sanded with 400 grit sandpaper and buffed with #0000 steel wool. This is a dark photo but I like the reflections.

Thanks for looking!

slipperyskip

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Re: Project Addison - 2014
« Reply #25 on: November 06, 2014, 11:30:01 AM »

Sanded off the finish on the gluing surfaces.




Clamp scheme.




This was the edge I was looking for. Hoprfully I can keep it this way. These photos were taken before gluing so there is a tiny gap.




More tape testing. Everything I read said to not leave the tape on a lacquer surface for more than 24 hours.  I'll probably need more time than that. I suspect the 24 hour thing is BS and this will prove it.

 


New thing I learned from a guitar finishing site. Keep your masking tape in plastic bags and be careful where you set the rolls down. Helps keep lint, sawdust and funky liquids off the tape edges. Love to learn new things.




Once it is finally glued down I pack the now mated holes with wood filler. There are three layers of wood that need to look like a single layer.






Sand the wood filler down to get a smooth surface.




The only photo in this sequence shot in direct sunlight. Makes a difference. Here I am laying down my first grille slat straight down the center.




Instead of measuring I like to use physical spacers to get my positioning correct. Four identical pieces of wood take the probability of error down to near zero.


After this I took the piece indoors and finished the grille work.




Cloudy, overcast day so I'm back to monkeying with the fill light. The remaining grille structure is complete.






The 1/16" x 1/4" slats are backed up by 1/4" x 1/4" pieces of basswood to get the depth I need.




All of these pieces are hand cut and sanded to fit.








Thanks for looking!
« Last Edit: November 10, 2014, 05:15:58 PM by slipperyskip »

slipperyskip

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Re: Project Addison - 2014
« Reply #26 on: November 07, 2014, 06:01:55 PM »

Taped off using a nice old thick paper grocery bag I had stashed away. After a single coat.




Fifteen coats and a day later. Sanded down 100 grit, spray, 220 grit, spray and 400 grit, spray.




Painted the back of the slats with a brush-on aluminum paint and then backed up the holes with pieces of cardboard.








« Last Edit: November 10, 2014, 05:15:16 PM by slipperyskip »

slipperyskip

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Re: Project Addison - 2014
« Reply #27 on: November 12, 2014, 11:31:27 AM »

Waiting for new, upgraded equipment and a few knobs to select from. Been concentrating on the photo shoot setup and lighting.




Photo number 350




4-way! In case anyone thought I was kidding.




Solar light tent setup. PVC pipe, ripped bedsheet, clothes pins and a table cloth stolen from a Las Vegas nightclub.

Knobs arrive Friday, video card ships tomorrow and Far Cry 4 releases on Tuesday. Gonna be close. :)

slipperyskip

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Re: Project Addison - 2014
« Reply #28 on: November 19, 2014, 07:09:26 PM »


Final photos coming soon. Probably late Friday. These are my knobs. They are made by a German company named Schaller who specializes in guitar parts. These knobs were originally intended for a Fender Stratocaster.

The left knob operates the left one and the right knob operates the right one. I recommend operating both at once for maximum effect.

slipperyskip

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Re: Project Addison - 2014
« Reply #29 on: November 21, 2014, 04:19:23 AM »






First off...Big thanks to Gigabyte VGA for providing this video card.  :) :) :)

The dream of the 970 just dropping in kinda went up in smoke. Wasn't too bad though. The MSI and Gigabyte cards share the same single 8-pin power plug but the Gigabyte's is turned the other way around. My custom low profile cable suddenly had to do yoga. Works fine and doesn't look too bad but I'll have to remake it.

Ran 3DMark Firestrike on it and got a 9349 which I guess is pretty good. Better than 97% according to the results. That was stock. I'll play with the OC stuff later. More importantly Far Cry 4 options are all maxed out including some acronyms I've never heard of.

Crazy thing is the 970 has a 25W lower TDP than the 760 I pulled out of there. Fan speed got up to 56% during benchmarking.

Now where can I find a hang glider?